Now is the perfect time to pick rosehips in the wild. Rosehips are a bit everywhere, by walking paths, by roads and forest ends. So incredibly bursting with vitamin c and beta carotene and thus perfect to pick now for the winter. I prefer to make rosehips on the rosehips I pick. It is an easy way to take advantage of them without requiring too much time or work on my part. If it is too complicated or time-consuming, there is often a risk that it will not happen at all and that is a shame.

The other day when I went for a walk with Nando, I saw several rosehip bushes. I stopped and picked a little on each bush. It is important to leave so that there will be rose hips next year. Remember not to pick too close to a road so that the rose hips are not contaminated with exhaust fumes.

To make rosehips on the rosehips that I picked, I start by rinsing them and letting them dry. Preferably in the sun if it is a sunny day.

Then I put them on a plate and put them in the oven at 50 degrees and let them dry. You can also dry them quickly in a dehydrator or in a dry room temperature, but it takes a few weeks. Leave the oven door ajar if you dry in the oven so that all the moisture comes out. When the rosehips are dry, I remove any small "tassels" that are left on them and then I mix them and strain off the small bumps. An ordinary metal strainer works perfectly.

I leave some of the rosehips whole, pour into a jar and store for the winter. Rosehip tastes a bit fruity and fresh. Let it stand for at least three minutes so that all the vitamins are released. Rosehips are incredibly rich in a variety of nutrients so it is something I like to do especially during the winter when you may need a little extra vitamin supplementation. Have you tried making your own rosehip? Out and pick now! October is a glorious period for picking rosehips.